Clarifying Cloud Hosting Questions

Cloud hosting services benefit companies in many ways, but there are some aspects of the technology that can seem confusing to businesses. One of the most daunting aspects of switching to cloud hosting is working out the finer points of pricing for cloud services.

The range of options, which encompasses cloud storage and software-as-a-solution, can confuse the matter of pricing and can be traced back to the cloud’s origins, James Maguire wrote in eWEEK. Public cloud providers began offering services in earnest in 2006 and quickly found a ready customer base. The reluctance of some large IT firms to provide cloud hosting services or adopt the technology provided an opportunity for smaller companies to gain a foothold in the market. While they were scrambling for market position, the competing cloud service providers neglected to establish any sort of price range for services.

“In the mad hurry to cater to a generational shift in IT, vendors never agreed on a factor that would have greatly aided customers: a standard pricing metric,” Maguire wrote. “What’s a unit of cloud services cost? Well, that depends on a blizzard of variables – on both the vendor and client side.”

The breadth of cloud hosting services available adds to the confusion, with public, private and hybrid clouds offered. Numerous variations on those three types are presented as options, as well as suites of options tailored to a variety of industries and business sizes. These variables further confuse the matter of price.

Migrating applications
Once the confusion over pricing is clarified and an agreement with a providers is signed, companies can begin moving their stored data and applications to cloud servers. As with pricing for cloud services, there is some confusion over how migrating applications from a dedicated server to cloud hosting works, contributor Jason Cumberland wrote in Data Center Knowledge.

One of the most persistent myths about the cloud is that databases don’t function well in the cloud. Cumberland wrote that while such may have been the case in previous years, the technology has evolved to the point that several cloud hosting providers now offer database migration services. Tiered storage options give subscribers three speeds to choose from, including one that is designed for transactional databases.

“An experienced service provider can easily build an integration path for dedicated physical servers into cloud environments when neither of the previous two options are ideal,” Cumberland wrote.

One of the most persistent myths about the cloud is that databases don’t function well in the cloud. Cumberland wrote that while such may have been the case in previous years, the technology has evolved to the point that several cloud hosting providers now offer database migration services. Tiered storage options give subscribers three speeds to choose from, including one that is designed for transactional databases.

“An experienced service provider can easily build an integration path for dedicated physical servers into cloud environments when neither of the previous two options are ideal,” Cumberland wrote.

“An experienced service provider can easily build an integration path for dedicated physical servers into cloud environments when neither of the previous two options are ideal,” Cumberland wrote.

About the author :

Lyza Latham lives for Cloud Hosting. To keep in contact with Lyza find her on Google+

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